All Posts   Posted:   September 3, 2015 by Lisa Daly - Dennis' 7 Dees Garden Center

We have a regular landscaping customer here at the Dennis' 7 Dees  Lake Oswego garden center who has us pull all the plant tags out when we ring him up at the cash register. He doesn't need them and he would rather have us recycle them. If you're a gardener, you've probably got two or three on the table, a few in your glove box, perhaps 3 or 4 or 1,000 or so laying around your yard.      

In January of this year, my husband and I packed up our lives and U-Hauled it across the country from North Carolina. Many (too many according to DH) of those things we packed were garden related. Birdbaths, rocks, pots, a seven foot metal chicken (honestly), and pots and pots of plants, most with their tags. A large number of those plants were confiscated by the agricultural gestapo on the border into California, but some of them I managed to smuggle through into Oregon.                             

Now that I am in a new growing zone (Portland is zone 7) how will I know what to plant and where? Well, for some things I have a bit of experience. I know rosemary likes it kind of dry and sunny since I had a huge shrub of it in my old garden. l know lamb's ear likes some shade, and I know vinca never ever ever goes away. But lots of other plants I am unfamiliar with and so when I go plant shopping, I pay close attention to the very same tags that our experienced landscaping friend likes to remove. (I bet you were wondering when I was going to get back to the tags....)

Plant tags are an invaluable tool for the gardener. In recent years they've become larger and more colorful, and they have a wealth of information on them. You can find watering information, sun light requirements, brief descriptions on size and color and the “all important” zone information. Heed your tags, O Gardener, because your success depends on them if you haven't got real life experience with your plant.

Keep your tags for next year's plant shopping expeditions. Did something do really well somewhere? Want more of it? You have the tag, it will be easy to find. No room to keep the tag? (Seriously? You haven't got room for a plant tag? Am I going to see you on “Hoarders” next season?) Take a picture of the tag with your cellphone. Make up a picture folder and put all your plant tag pictures in there. Are you at the nursery right now and can't remember the name of the plant that did really well next to Aunt Ginny's camellia? Yeah, open up that cellphone and check the picture of the tag.

Plant tags are very helpful and I urge you to pay attention to them for the success of your garden and your plant shopping expeditions!

Thanks for reading and hope to see you soon at the garden center!

We have a regular landscaping customer here at the Dennis' 7 Dees  Lake Oswego garden center who has us pull all the plant tags out when we ring him up at the cash register. He doesn't need them and he would rather have us recycle them. If you're a gardener, you've probably got two or three on the table, a few in your glove box, perhaps 3 or 4 or 1,000 or so laying around your yard.      

In January of this year, my husband and I packed up our lives and U-Hauled it across the country from North Carolina. Many (too many according to DH) of those things we packed were garden related. Birdbaths, rocks, pots, a seven foot metal chicken (honestly), and pots and pots of plants, most with their tags. A large number of those plants were confiscated by the agricultural gestapo on the border into California, but some of them I managed to smuggle through into Oregon.                             

Now that I am in a new growing zone (Portland is zone 7) how will I know what to plant and where? Well, for some things I have a bit of experience. I know rosemary likes it kind of dry and sunny since I had a huge shrub of it in my old garden. l know lamb's ear likes some shade, and I know vinca never ever ever goes away. But lots of other plants I am unfamiliar with and so when I go plant shopping, I pay close attention to the very same tags that our experienced landscaping friend likes to remove. (I bet you were wondering when I was going to get back to the tags....)

Plant tags are an invaluable tool for the gardener. In recent years they've become larger and more colorful, and they have a wealth of information on them. You can find watering information, sun light requirements, brief descriptions on size and color and the “all important” zone information. Heed your tags, O Gardener, because your success depends on them if you haven't got real life experience with your plant.

Keep your tags for next year's plant shopping expeditions. Did something do really well somewhere? Want more of it? You have the tag, it will be easy to find. No room to keep the tag? (Seriously? You haven't got room for a plant tag? Am I going to see you on “Hoarders” next season?) Take a picture of the tag with your cellphone. Make up a picture folder and put all your plant tag pictures in there. Are you at the nursery right now and can't remember the name of the plant that did really well next to Aunt Ginny's camellia? Yeah, open up that cellphone and check the picture of the tag.

Plant tags are very helpful and I urge you to pay attention to them for the success of your garden and your plant shopping expeditions!

Thanks for reading and hope to see you soon at the garden center!