All Posts   Posted:   April 17, 2013

What?                  

What do we mean…Growing edibles has skyrocketed in popularity (for good reasons) and you may want to grow something you can eat without dedicating exclusive space to a vegetable garden or fruit orchard; there are edible plant examples within all of the basic plant categories used in landscape design (see list below) and many add beauty and function to your garden and table.

Why?          

Recent food safety concerns, cost/value of grocery store purchases, beauty of many edibles (eggplant for example), very local & convenient, sun/space limitations for exclusive vegetable garden area, intermingling edibles throughout the garden can confuse the pests and result in reduced insect/disease problems.

Who? /Which plants?      

Beautiful and easy fruit trees are persimmons & figs; blueberries (especially the semi-evergreen varieties) are great shrubs for informal hedges or foundation plantings as are evergreen huckleberries and tea camellias; vines such as kiwi or hops and green beans are fast growing and can provide seasonal privacy screening; artichokes have a bold texture and silver leaf color that is striking in the garden and they are also very drought tolerant once established; one of the most beautiful

vegetables in the garden is eggplant and it should be considered as an ornamental if you don’t like to eat them; many herbs make wonderful groundcovers especially thyme, oregano and marjoram (try golden forms to add color) and strawberries work well as ground cover and erosion control (alpine strawberries grow in partial shade-shade).

Where?       

Your biggest limiting factor is the amount of sunlight you receive and the amount of time you have to commit.  If you have limited space you can grow in containers, use vertical techniques, try columnar/espaliered fruit trees and tuck herbs and greens in between larger plants.  If you only have that hot, dry patch of soil plant artichokes, and drought tolerant herbs like rosemary, lavender and thyme.  When attempting to create walls, fences or barriers consider vines or espaliered fruit trees or a mixed hedgerow of edibles such as blueberries, raspberries, and huckleberries with some taller growing tea camellias.

How?          

Determine your style: ex. formal, cottage, Mediterranean, NW/Asian. Consider texture, form, scale, exposure, soil culture, seasonal changes, repetition/patterns, color elements & hardscape/structural elements.  Contact us to make an appointment for a free design with our Planscaper program!

Edible landscape plant examples (by category)

Trees: Often available on dwarf or semi-dwarf rootstock or in columnar or espaliered forms.  Pears, plums, cherries, apples, Asian pears, persimmons, figs, olives (peaches, nectarines need a regular spray program for disease problems)

Shrubs: Evergreen huckleberries, blueberries, elderberry, currants, goumi, seaberry, tea camellia, pineapple guava (may not get enough heat to fruit regularly)

Perennials: artichokes, rhubarb, prickly pear cactus, and asparagus (also self-sowing annuals: leeks, parsley, and cilantro)

Bulbs: onions, garlic, saffron crocus

Vines: kiwi (fuzzy & hardy types), hops, grapes, beans

Ground cover: thyme, marjoram/oregano, cranberries, lingonberries, strawberries (alpine strawberries grow well in shade), wintergreen, salal

Edible flowers: borage, nasturtiums, calendula, violas, roses…

What?                  

What do we mean…Growing edibles has skyrocketed in popularity (for good reasons) and you may want to grow something you can eat without dedicating exclusive space to a vegetable garden or fruit orchard; there are edible plant examples within all of the basic plant categories used in landscape design (see list below) and many add beauty and function to your garden and table.

Why?          

Recent food safety concerns, cost/value of grocery store purchases, beauty of many edibles (eggplant for example), very local & convenient, sun/space limitations for exclusive vegetable garden area, intermingling edibles throughout the garden can confuse the pests and result in reduced insect/disease problems.

Who? /Which plants?      

Beautiful and easy fruit trees are persimmons & figs; blueberries (especially the semi-evergreen varieties) are great shrubs for informal hedges or foundation plantings as are evergreen huckleberries and tea camellias; vines such as kiwi or hops and green beans are fast growing and can provide seasonal privacy screening; artichokes have a bold texture and silver leaf color that is striking in the garden and they are also very drought tolerant once established; one of the most beautiful

vegetables in the garden is eggplant and it should be considered as an ornamental if you don’t like to eat them; many herbs make wonderful groundcovers especially thyme, oregano and marjoram (try golden forms to add color) and strawberries work well as ground cover and erosion control (alpine strawberries grow in partial shade-shade).

Where?       

Your biggest limiting factor is the amount of sunlight you receive and the amount of time you have to commit.  If you have limited space you can grow in containers, use vertical techniques, try columnar/espaliered fruit trees and tuck herbs and greens in between larger plants.  If you only have that hot, dry patch of soil plant artichokes, and drought tolerant herbs like rosemary, lavender and thyme.  When attempting to create walls, fences or barriers consider vines or espaliered fruit trees or a mixed hedgerow of edibles such as blueberries, raspberries, and huckleberries with some taller growing tea camellias.

How?          

Determine your style: ex. formal, cottage, Mediterranean, NW/Asian. Consider texture, form, scale, exposure, soil culture, seasonal changes, repetition/patterns, color elements & hardscape/structural elements.  Contact us to make an appointment for a free design with our Planscaper program!

Edible landscape plant examples (by category)

Trees: Often available on dwarf or semi-dwarf rootstock or in columnar or espaliered forms.  Pears, plums, cherries, apples, Asian pears, persimmons, figs, olives (peaches, nectarines need a regular spray program for disease problems)

Shrubs: Evergreen huckleberries, blueberries, elderberry, currants, goumi, seaberry, tea camellia, pineapple guava (may not get enough heat to fruit regularly)

Perennials: artichokes, rhubarb, prickly pear cactus, and asparagus (also self-sowing annuals: leeks, parsley, and cilantro)

Bulbs: onions, garlic, saffron crocus

Vines: kiwi (fuzzy & hardy types), hops, grapes, beans

Ground cover: thyme, marjoram/oregano, cranberries, lingonberries, strawberries (alpine strawberries grow well in shade), wintergreen, salal

Edible flowers: borage, nasturtiums, calendula, violas, roses…