All Posts   Posted:   August 30, 2016

Now is prime time to overseed and repair any unsightly spots in your lawn. Follow these easy steps towards a perfect lawn!

Step 1: Control Weeds

Control any broadleaf weeds (anything that’s not a grass) either removing by hand or with a weed killer such as Bonide Weed Beater Ultra. This will kill the weeds and clover without harming the existing lawn. It’s best to spray when temperatures are below 80 degrees and dry; this product is rain-proof within an hour and can be used in temperatures as low as 45 degrees. For best results, spray one week before you mow your lawn so the weeds have plenty of surface area for the herbicide to cover.

Step 2: Mow Lawn Really Short

If you have completed Step 1, be sure to bag your lawn clippings. Set your mower to the lowest setting and bag your clippings. By mowing the lawn really short, this will help the new seed to reach the soil more easily and will allow the new lawn seedlings to establish before being mowed again.

Step 3: Thatch & Aerate

After mowing, rake out any thatch and dead moss that has built up over the years. Thatch is the organic build-up of materials between the lawn blades and the actual soil layer. A thick layer of thatch can negatively impact new grass growth and potentially lead to turf grass diseases.

Once you have removed excess thatch, you can aerate. Most soils in the Willamette Valley are clay-based and don’t allow for good drainage or air pockets. Core Aeration will create small air pockets in the soil to allow for better air circulation around the root system and help increase drainage.

Step 4: Fill in the Low Spots

Use a quality top soil to help fill in any of the low spots and aeration holes; use a lawn roller to help the soil settle into place (optional).

Step 5: Add Lime

Our soils in the Willamette Valley are acidic due to the lovely winter rainfalls. Turf lawns prefer to have a more neutral soil pH level (6.0–7.0); a home soil test is a simple way to check pH levels. In order to accomplish this, Lilly Miller Lime needs to be applied in the fall and spring months; this is a fine dolomite lime that can be added to the lawn via a drop spreader. By lowering the pH in the soil, calcium and magnesium become more readily available and organic life will increase. This will help combat the pesky weeds, moss, and gradual thinning of the lawn. DO NOT mix lime with fertilizer; there will be a chemical reaction and you will lose a lot of the nitrogen from the fertilizer as it turns to gas.

Step 6: Seed

Now you can apply seed! Be sure to use a Dennis' 7 Dees custom lawn seed or other premium seed blend. Ask us which blend is right for your needs; seed can be applied via a hand spreader or a drop spreader. When overseeding, use a rate of 3½–5 lbs of seed per 1000 square feet.

Step 7: Cover

Apply a light layer of mulch, covering seed approximately 1/8–1/4” (G&B Soil Building Conditioner or peat moss), to help keep the seed moist until it sprouts.

Step 8: Water

Keep the new seed evenly moist at all times until it has germinated; running sprinklers for many short bursts is a lot better than one long watering. Wait at least 2–3 weeks before mowing new grass.

Step 9: Apply Fertilizer

About 4–6 weeks after planting, apply a good fertilizer to entire turf area. We recommend either Bonide Premium Lawn Food or G&B Organic Lawn Fertilizer. It’s good to get in the habit of fertilizing the lawn 2–3 times per year during the active growing season: spring, summer, and fall. If your lawn is brown or dormant, this will give it the kick it needs to wake up and green up!

   

Now is prime time to overseed and repair any unsightly spots in your lawn. Follow these easy steps towards a perfect lawn!

Step 1: Control Weeds

Control any broadleaf weeds (anything that’s not a grass) either removing by hand or with a weed killer such as Bonide Weed Beater Ultra. This will kill the weeds and clover without harming the existing lawn. It’s best to spray when temperatures are below 80 degrees and dry; this product is rain-proof within an hour and can be used in temperatures as low as 45 degrees. For best results, spray one week before you mow your lawn so the weeds have plenty of surface area for the herbicide to cover.

Step 2: Mow Lawn Really Short

If you have completed Step 1, be sure to bag your lawn clippings. Set your mower to the lowest setting and bag your clippings. By mowing the lawn really short, this will help the new seed to reach the soil more easily and will allow the new lawn seedlings to establish before being mowed again.

Step 3: Thatch & Aerate

After mowing, rake out any thatch and dead moss that has built up over the years. Thatch is the organic build-up of materials between the lawn blades and the actual soil layer. A thick layer of thatch can negatively impact new grass growth and potentially lead to turf grass diseases.

Once you have removed excess thatch, you can aerate. Most soils in the Willamette Valley are clay-based and don’t allow for good drainage or air pockets. Core Aeration will create small air pockets in the soil to allow for better air circulation around the root system and help increase drainage.

Step 4: Fill in the Low Spots

Use a quality top soil to help fill in any of the low spots and aeration holes; use a lawn roller to help the soil settle into place (optional).

Step 5: Add Lime

Our soils in the Willamette Valley are acidic due to the lovely winter rainfalls. Turf lawns prefer to have a more neutral soil pH level (6.0–7.0); a home soil test is a simple way to check pH levels. In order to accomplish this, Lilly Miller Lime needs to be applied in the fall and spring months; this is a fine dolomite lime that can be added to the lawn via a drop spreader. By lowering the pH in the soil, calcium and magnesium become more readily available and organic life will increase. This will help combat the pesky weeds, moss, and gradual thinning of the lawn. DO NOT mix lime with fertilizer; there will be a chemical reaction and you will lose a lot of the nitrogen from the fertilizer as it turns to gas.

Step 6: Seed

Now you can apply seed! Be sure to use a Dennis' 7 Dees custom lawn seed or other premium seed blend. Ask us which blend is right for your needs; seed can be applied via a hand spreader or a drop spreader. When overseeding, use a rate of 3½–5 lbs of seed per 1000 square feet.

Step 7: Cover

Apply a light layer of mulch, covering seed approximately 1/8–1/4” (G&B Soil Building Conditioner or peat moss), to help keep the seed moist until it sprouts.

Step 8: Water

Keep the new seed evenly moist at all times until it has germinated; running sprinklers for many short bursts is a lot better than one long watering. Wait at least 2–3 weeks before mowing new grass.

Step 9: Apply Fertilizer

About 4–6 weeks after planting, apply a good fertilizer to entire turf area. We recommend either Bonide Premium Lawn Food or G&B Organic Lawn Fertilizer. It’s good to get in the habit of fertilizing the lawn 2–3 times per year during the active growing season: spring, summer, and fall. If your lawn is brown or dormant, this will give it the kick it needs to wake up and green up!