All Posts   Posted:   February 17, 2016 by Angela Hoyt - Dennis' 7 Dees Buyer

Real estate in my garden is becoming sparse. This is the time of year that I walk my garden and ask each plant based on their size, do you provide a good return on investment? Am I happy with the amount of blooms produced in the season? Does this plant provide the fall color promised to me in the gardening magazine I read? If the answer is No- the plant gets yanked out! Every year, my husband asks the same question “Can we plant blueberries this year?”.

Traditional blueberry plants provide multiple seasons of interest. They have bright red stems during the winter months, fabulous white bell flowers in the summer, extra tasty fruit in the summer and jaw dropping fall color. What more could a gardener want! Talk about return on investment, right?! Back to reality, traditional blueberries need to have at least two different varieties in order to cross pollinate thus producing a better crop. I’m still sold until I remember that each plant gets 6’ tall and 6’ wide when they are mature. If I need 2 plants, I’m talking about a 12- 15’ x 12-15’ square of precious garden space. That’s space I don’t have.

There is a nursery in Oregon that is the leader in blueberry breeding that just may have saved my marriage! Fall Creek Nursery has developed dwarf blueberries. These compact gems will only get about 2-3’ tall and wide.

Varieties include:

Peach Sorbet: this compact blueberry has stunning year-round foliage colors ranging from vibrant peach and pink to lime and emerald green in the spring to a dramatic eggplant purple in the winter in cooler climates. Peach Sorbet is a beautiful accent plant to mix with other ornamentals and produces a nice crop of large blueberries mid-summer.

Blueberry glaze: this fabulous little blueberry will remind you of a boxwood and can be sheared as such.  It's dark green, glossy leaves give this plant a richness and the mid-summer berries are small but packed with flavor.  Almost black when ripe, the blueberries of Blueberry Glaze pack a punch of antioxidants too. Plant as a sheared hedge or put in patio pots right outside your door!

Jelly Bean: this cold-hardy compact little puffball of a blueberry offers elegant, rich green foliage with hues of red. For a small plant, Jelly Bean produces a sweet little bumper crop of large, delicious berries and is a great little hedge, stand-alone plant or container garden option.

All are easy to grow and options that give off the multiple seasonal interests including awesome flavorful berries without taking up my entire garden. The other greatest thing about these compact varieties is because they have brighter flowers and bold colored new growth than the traditional berries, they can be mixed into my perennial boarders seamlessly.  Varieties like Bountiful Blue and Sunshine Blue actually keep their leaves all winter for an added bonus.

Next time you are out walking your garden, ask yourself, is this plant worth its real estate? If you have a sunny location (6 hours of afternoon sun), remember the dwarf blueberries. Their return is worth it!

Real estate in my garden is becoming sparse. This is the time of year that I walk my garden and ask each plant based on their size, do you provide a good return on investment? Am I happy with the amount of blooms produced in the season? Does this plant provide the fall color promised to me in the gardening magazine I read? If the answer is No- the plant gets yanked out! Every year, my husband asks the same question “Can we plant blueberries this year?”.

Traditional blueberry plants provide multiple seasons of interest. They have bright red stems during the winter months, fabulous white bell flowers in the summer, extra tasty fruit in the summer and jaw dropping fall color. What more could a gardener want! Talk about return on investment, right?! Back to reality, traditional blueberries need to have at least two different varieties in order to cross pollinate thus producing a better crop. I’m still sold until I remember that each plant gets 6’ tall and 6’ wide when they are mature. If I need 2 plants, I’m talking about a 12- 15’ x 12-15’ square of precious garden space. That’s space I don’t have.

There is a nursery in Oregon that is the leader in blueberry breeding that just may have saved my marriage! Fall Creek Nursery has developed dwarf blueberries. These compact gems will only get about 2-3’ tall and wide.

Varieties include:

Peach Sorbet: this compact blueberry has stunning year-round foliage colors ranging from vibrant peach and pink to lime and emerald green in the spring to a dramatic eggplant purple in the winter in cooler climates. Peach Sorbet is a beautiful accent plant to mix with other ornamentals and produces a nice crop of large blueberries mid-summer.

Blueberry glaze: this fabulous little blueberry will remind you of a boxwood and can be sheared as such.  It's dark green, glossy leaves give this plant a richness and the mid-summer berries are small but packed with flavor.  Almost black when ripe, the blueberries of Blueberry Glaze pack a punch of antioxidants too. Plant as a sheared hedge or put in patio pots right outside your door!

Jelly Bean: this cold-hardy compact little puffball of a blueberry offers elegant, rich green foliage with hues of red. For a small plant, Jelly Bean produces a sweet little bumper crop of large, delicious berries and is a great little hedge, stand-alone plant or container garden option.

All are easy to grow and options that give off the multiple seasonal interests including awesome flavorful berries without taking up my entire garden. The other greatest thing about these compact varieties is because they have brighter flowers and bold colored new growth than the traditional berries, they can be mixed into my perennial boarders seamlessly.  Varieties like Bountiful Blue and Sunshine Blue actually keep their leaves all winter for an added bonus.

Next time you are out walking your garden, ask yourself, is this plant worth its real estate? If you have a sunny location (6 hours of afternoon sun), remember the dwarf blueberries. Their return is worth it!