All Posts   Posted:   October 28, 2016 by Joe Poulter - Residential Landscape Maintenance Account Manager

As we round out the month we are approaching the October record for rainfall.  7.41 inches as of the last count with a chance to break the record by Halloween.  Water seems an appropriate topic and specifically water mitigation.  Soil can only hold and absorb a certain amount of water.  If you are lucky you have quick draining soil with perfect slopes and water is not a problem.  Since we live in the Pacific Northwest that is probably not the case.  I will discuss mitigation options for lawns, beds, and storm drains.

Lawns

If the lawn is soft and soggy, with water squeezing up with each step, you have drainage issues.  This can be a major cause of grass thinning and dying out in the fall and winter months.  On top of that you can’t even walk on your lawn let alone use it for the next 4 months.  The only way to effectively change this is to add lawn drainage.  Depending on soil type, parallel drains are installed on 3 to 4 foot centers throughout the lawn and backfilled with a special type of sand.  Excess water from the lawn filters into the drains which is then whisked away to an appropriate spot. We have installed this type of system in many properties throughout Portland and have had great success. It is the same system installed at golf courses and sports turf fields but we have been able to make it available to homeowners. 
 

Beds

Dealing with saturated beds is usually an easier prospect.  If there are areas where standing water or runoff is an issue it can often be dealt with by installing dry creek beds, rock gardens, or a simple surface drain to move the water elsewhere.  A strategically placed path of river rock can often take care of areas that turn to mud or wash out with heavy rains.  Mild erosion or runoff can also be dealt with by planting groundcovers and spreading plants that will add some color as well as help hold soil in place.      

Drains

If your gutter drains are clogged up or if you just want to stop dumping roof water into the storm drain system dry creek beds are a great way to take care of the water while creating a landscape feature at the same time.  I have disconnected two of my gutters to create dry creek beds and love the effect.  One bed is lined with creeping plants and moss that have grown up and around the rock edges.  It is a focal point of my front yard when dry and when raining the sound of the rain flowing down the chain and hitting the rocks is soothing and visual effect of my temporary pond out my kitchen window is quite pleasant.  In back I have a dry creek bed that curves in front of a Japanese maple and travels under a gravel path before reaching the basin.  The area is inspired by Japanese garden design and the creek bed adds a lot to the overall design.   

Click here to contact us today if you'd like us to help with any of these water mitigation solutions.

As we round out the month we are approaching the October record for rainfall.  7.41 inches as of the last count with a chance to break the record by Halloween.  Water seems an appropriate topic and specifically water mitigation.  Soil can only hold and absorb a certain amount of water.  If you are lucky you have quick draining soil with perfect slopes and water is not a problem.  Since we live in the Pacific Northwest that is probably not the case.  I will discuss mitigation options for lawns, beds, and storm drains.

Lawns

If the lawn is soft and soggy, with water squeezing up with each step, you have drainage issues.  This can be a major cause of grass thinning and dying out in the fall and winter months.  On top of that you can’t even walk on your lawn let alone use it for the next 4 months.  The only way to effectively change this is to add lawn drainage.  Depending on soil type, parallel drains are installed on 3 to 4 foot centers throughout the lawn and backfilled with a special type of sand.  Excess water from the lawn filters into the drains which is then whisked away to an appropriate spot. We have installed this type of system in many properties throughout Portland and have had great success. It is the same system installed at golf courses and sports turf fields but we have been able to make it available to homeowners. 
 

Beds

Dealing with saturated beds is usually an easier prospect.  If there are areas where standing water or runoff is an issue it can often be dealt with by installing dry creek beds, rock gardens, or a simple surface drain to move the water elsewhere.  A strategically placed path of river rock can often take care of areas that turn to mud or wash out with heavy rains.  Mild erosion or runoff can also be dealt with by planting groundcovers and spreading plants that will add some color as well as help hold soil in place.      

Drains

If your gutter drains are clogged up or if you just want to stop dumping roof water into the storm drain system dry creek beds are a great way to take care of the water while creating a landscape feature at the same time.  I have disconnected two of my gutters to create dry creek beds and love the effect.  One bed is lined with creeping plants and moss that have grown up and around the rock edges.  It is a focal point of my front yard when dry and when raining the sound of the rain flowing down the chain and hitting the rocks is soothing and visual effect of my temporary pond out my kitchen window is quite pleasant.  In back I have a dry creek bed that curves in front of a Japanese maple and travels under a gravel path before reaching the basin.  The area is inspired by Japanese garden design and the creek bed adds a lot to the overall design.   

Click here to contact us today if you'd like us to help with any of these water mitigation solutions.