All Posts   Posted:   March 10, 2016

With the warm weather we had in February plants are coming out of dormancy earlier than normal.  Lawns are no exception and many are already growing rapidly.  If you are lucky enough to have a full sun lawn with perfectly drained soil your grass may be looking great at this point.  Unfortunately few Oregon lawns get the benefit of these conditions.  Excessive shade, poor drainage, soggy weather, and the disease issues those conditions foster can cause lawns to thin out dramatically in the winter.  When the lawn thins out it opens up  conditions for moss and weeds to try and take over.

If you have a few bare patches that need some tlc the maintenance team will be working on it over the next month.  Our maintenance team puts down a late winter fertilizer at the end of January that will help give a kick start to the existing grass.  We are in the process now of putting down iron which will start to kill any moss that has gained a foothold this winter.  The next step is to get some seed down.  Historical recommendations call for April 15th as a good time to begin seeding in the spring.  Soil temperatures need to reach 50 to 55 degrees before germination occurs.  With warmer spring weather like we had this February soil temperatures will reach that threshold earlier.  Because of this we will be seeding later in March. 

If there are larger areas of lawn that perennially die back to a muddy mess and never quite thrive it may be time to think about more drastic measures.  If the problem area gets adequate sun (at least 4 to 6 hours of direct sun a day) then drainage may be the issue.  Low areas of lawn that receive runoff can potentially be corrected by installing a drain in the low area, so that instead of pooling in that spot water is routed off away from the problem area.  If the lawn is relatively flat and water doesn’t drain away (quishy and soggy when walked on)  a full drainage system is an option.  There are numerous options for this but they basically all consist of parallel trenches dug through the lawn that are filled with a  pipe and some type of aggregate and are then covered with grass.  Water from the lawn filters into the pipes and is moved away from the lawn. 

If the lawn area in question is in full shade (less than 4 hours per day) it may be a better idea do ditch the lawn entirely and have a new planting bed created.  There are a plethora of interesting plants that can thrive in a shady area of the yard.

With the warm weather we had in February plants are coming out of dormancy earlier than normal.  Lawns are no exception and many are already growing rapidly.  If you are lucky enough to have a full sun lawn with perfectly drained soil your grass may be looking great at this point.  Unfortunately few Oregon lawns get the benefit of these conditions.  Excessive shade, poor drainage, soggy weather, and the disease issues those conditions foster can cause lawns to thin out dramatically in the winter.  When the lawn thins out it opens up  conditions for moss and weeds to try and take over.

If you have a few bare patches that need some tlc the maintenance team will be working on it over the next month.  Our maintenance team puts down a late winter fertilizer at the end of January that will help give a kick start to the existing grass.  We are in the process now of putting down iron which will start to kill any moss that has gained a foothold this winter.  The next step is to get some seed down.  Historical recommendations call for April 15th as a good time to begin seeding in the spring.  Soil temperatures need to reach 50 to 55 degrees before germination occurs.  With warmer spring weather like we had this February soil temperatures will reach that threshold earlier.  Because of this we will be seeding later in March. 

If there are larger areas of lawn that perennially die back to a muddy mess and never quite thrive it may be time to think about more drastic measures.  If the problem area gets adequate sun (at least 4 to 6 hours of direct sun a day) then drainage may be the issue.  Low areas of lawn that receive runoff can potentially be corrected by installing a drain in the low area, so that instead of pooling in that spot water is routed off away from the problem area.  If the lawn is relatively flat and water doesn’t drain away (quishy and soggy when walked on)  a full drainage system is an option.  There are numerous options for this but they basically all consist of parallel trenches dug through the lawn that are filled with a  pipe and some type of aggregate and are then covered with grass.  Water from the lawn filters into the pipes and is moved away from the lawn. 

If the lawn area in question is in full shade (less than 4 hours per day) it may be a better idea do ditch the lawn entirely and have a new planting bed created.  There are a plethora of interesting plants that can thrive in a shady area of the yard.