All Posts   Posted:   August 30, 2016 by Angela Hoyt - Plant Buyer

If you think tomatoes are easy to grow, you should try growing blueberries. In my opinion blueberries may be the easiest edibles to grow in the Pacific Northwest. Not only do they take acidic soils, which are naturally in your garden, blueberries are a plant that just keeps on giving.

In the spring, gardeners are presented with beautiful mostly white (some are pink) bell shaped flower that last quite well in our rains. Summer of course brings the bountiful and delicious snack. Fall brings the awesome array of fiery red mixed with burgundies and oranges foliage. The winter blues never seem to last long when presented with the bright red stems of the blueberry bushes. 

Here are three varieties everyone should have in their garden.

Blue crop:  A traditional variety that won’t disappoint. Very large blue fruit that seem to produce for the entire month of July. Blue crop will get large, so give it some room to grow and thrive. That means 6-8 feet tall and wide. This variety does need another variety to pollinate so keep that in mind. But really, can you have too many blueberries?

Sunshine Blue: On the complete opposite spectrum. Not only is this a compact variety (3-4 feet tall and wide), but during mild winters this variety will keep its leaves.  A bit smaller berry than the traditional, but sweet in taste. This is a self-fertile variety so if you have limited space in your garden- have no fear!

Bountiful Blue: The name holds true. This is a bountiful producer of medium sized fruit.  With a great light pink flower show in the spring, beautiful contrasting cool blue leaves and compact in size, anyone can easily pop this plant into any sunny place in the garden. Oh did I mention this one is also self-fertile? What variety is more perfect?

Fall is really the best time to be planting. Think about it. The hot sun has warmed up the soil so well the roots can settle in fast before the winter chills, and since you have been sitting on your porch drinking your iced tea all summer long, you know exactly what areas in your landscape need a new face lift. Why not plant something that keeps on giving?

If you think tomatoes are easy to grow, you should try growing blueberries. In my opinion blueberries may be the easiest edibles to grow in the Pacific Northwest. Not only do they take acidic soils, which are naturally in your garden, blueberries are a plant that just keeps on giving.

In the spring, gardeners are presented with beautiful mostly white (some are pink) bell shaped flower that last quite well in our rains. Summer of course brings the bountiful and delicious snack. Fall brings the awesome array of fiery red mixed with burgundies and oranges foliage. The winter blues never seem to last long when presented with the bright red stems of the blueberry bushes. 

Here are three varieties everyone should have in their garden.

Blue crop:  A traditional variety that won’t disappoint. Very large blue fruit that seem to produce for the entire month of July. Blue crop will get large, so give it some room to grow and thrive. That means 6-8 feet tall and wide. This variety does need another variety to pollinate so keep that in mind. But really, can you have too many blueberries?

Sunshine Blue: On the complete opposite spectrum. Not only is this a compact variety (3-4 feet tall and wide), but during mild winters this variety will keep its leaves.  A bit smaller berry than the traditional, but sweet in taste. This is a self-fertile variety so if you have limited space in your garden- have no fear!

Bountiful Blue: The name holds true. This is a bountiful producer of medium sized fruit.  With a great light pink flower show in the spring, beautiful contrasting cool blue leaves and compact in size, anyone can easily pop this plant into any sunny place in the garden. Oh did I mention this one is also self-fertile? What variety is more perfect?

Fall is really the best time to be planting. Think about it. The hot sun has warmed up the soil so well the roots can settle in fast before the winter chills, and since you have been sitting on your porch drinking your iced tea all summer long, you know exactly what areas in your landscape need a new face lift. Why not plant something that keeps on giving?