All Posts   Posted:   November 3, 2016 by Angela Hoyt - Plant Buyer

Back yard bird watching has become one of my favorite things to do in the fall and winter months. Now that I can’t be outside all day, I love to snuggle up to my cup of tea, and watch the birds through my window. Last year, I set my camera up in the living room pointing at my feeders so I learn and track my visitors. My husband thought I was crazy at first- then I found him taking photos too!

While I consider myself a lifetime novice, I have learned some tips and tricks to get the birds to my feeders.

Tip#1: Learn the most common birds in my area.

 For most of us, these birds are what I call the fun little birds; Juncos, Nuthatches, Grosbeaks, Finches, and Chickadees.

Tip #2: Choose the correct Feeder

Since birds are finicky; you may want to try out more than one type of feeder and see the bird response.

  • A tube feeder with large holes is long and skinny. The birds cling to the side of the feeder while they pull the seeds out. 
  • A Finch sock is another great option as it has smaller holes and will accommodate smaller seed like Black Nyjer.
  • A Hopper feeder will accommodate large seeds and nuts. These look like house that filled with seed.
  • Platform Feeders
  • A wire mesh feeder
  • Suet baskets
  • Hummingbird feeders

Tip #3: Bring out the gourmet food

All of the bird seed available at Dennis 7 Dees has been washed so it’s not dusty and dirty and they are debris free (no sticks and rocks). I personally prefer the seed that will not sprout and is easy to clean up.  I have personally tried everything available at Dennis 7 Dees and here are my top 3.

  1. Fine Sunflower Chips-This has become my “go to” for my hopper feeders.  I seem to get the most bird diversity to my hopper feeder, especially in the winter months. Since the sunflower chips are already cracked- they won’t sprout.
  2. Deck, Porch and Patio- My go to for my tube feeders with large holes. It’s a mix of sunflower chips, cracked peanuts, Pistachios and hulled pumpkin seeds. I tend to see a lot of Grosbeaks, nuthatches and Finches at these feeders.
  3. Fruit and Berry- Perfect for tube feeders, platform feeder and hoppers. It’s really cool to see the birds attracted to these feeders. I tend to get more of the larger type birds with this food. Woodpeckers, Robins, Flickers and Thrush appear amongst the Chickadees, Grosbeaks and Titmice.  This blend is contains sunflower seed, peanuts, safflower seed, dried apples, dried cherries, dried cranberries, juniper berries and raisons. The only word of caution- I would only use this food in the winter months if you have a roof over your ports, otherwise the dried fruit will swell with water and clog the eating ports.

Tip #4: Keep ‘em Clean

You don’t want to eat from a dirty plate and neither do the birds. Be sure to clean them with soap and warm water every once in a while so the food doesn’t clog or mold.
 

Tip #5: Choose the best location

Decide on a place to hang your feeder. Whether it’s on a hook, pole, or a tree make sure three things can happen.

  1. You are able to refill the feeder.
  2. Birds can eat safely without the threat of cats or other “eliminators”.
  3. The birds can eat a small amount and quickly find shelter on branches to digest. Then they will eat more and fly to a branch.

Don’t fret if you hang a new feeder and they don’t come to it right away. Sometimes it takes a while for them to find it. But when they do, sit back and enjoy the show! You will soon be mesmerized too.

Back yard bird watching has become one of my favorite things to do in the fall and winter months. Now that I can’t be outside all day, I love to snuggle up to my cup of tea, and watch the birds through my window. Last year, I set my camera up in the living room pointing at my feeders so I learn and track my visitors. My husband thought I was crazy at first- then I found him taking photos too!

While I consider myself a lifetime novice, I have learned some tips and tricks to get the birds to my feeders.

Tip#1: Learn the most common birds in my area.

 For most of us, these birds are what I call the fun little birds; Juncos, Nuthatches, Grosbeaks, Finches, and Chickadees.

Tip #2: Choose the correct Feeder

Since birds are finicky; you may want to try out more than one type of feeder and see the bird response.

  • A tube feeder with large holes is long and skinny. The birds cling to the side of the feeder while they pull the seeds out. 
  • A Finch sock is another great option as it has smaller holes and will accommodate smaller seed like Black Nyjer.
  • A Hopper feeder will accommodate large seeds and nuts. These look like house that filled with seed.
  • Platform Feeders
  • A wire mesh feeder
  • Suet baskets
  • Hummingbird feeders

Tip #3: Bring out the gourmet food

All of the bird seed available at Dennis 7 Dees has been washed so it’s not dusty and dirty and they are debris free (no sticks and rocks). I personally prefer the seed that will not sprout and is easy to clean up.  I have personally tried everything available at Dennis 7 Dees and here are my top 3.

  1. Fine Sunflower Chips-This has become my “go to” for my hopper feeders.  I seem to get the most bird diversity to my hopper feeder, especially in the winter months. Since the sunflower chips are already cracked- they won’t sprout.
  2. Deck, Porch and Patio- My go to for my tube feeders with large holes. It’s a mix of sunflower chips, cracked peanuts, Pistachios and hulled pumpkin seeds. I tend to see a lot of Grosbeaks, nuthatches and Finches at these feeders.
  3. Fruit and Berry- Perfect for tube feeders, platform feeder and hoppers. It’s really cool to see the birds attracted to these feeders. I tend to get more of the larger type birds with this food. Woodpeckers, Robins, Flickers and Thrush appear amongst the Chickadees, Grosbeaks and Titmice.  This blend is contains sunflower seed, peanuts, safflower seed, dried apples, dried cherries, dried cranberries, juniper berries and raisons. The only word of caution- I would only use this food in the winter months if you have a roof over your ports, otherwise the dried fruit will swell with water and clog the eating ports.

Tip #4: Keep ‘em Clean

You don’t want to eat from a dirty plate and neither do the birds. Be sure to clean them with soap and warm water every once in a while so the food doesn’t clog or mold.
 

Tip #5: Choose the best location

Decide on a place to hang your feeder. Whether it’s on a hook, pole, or a tree make sure three things can happen.

  1. You are able to refill the feeder.
  2. Birds can eat safely without the threat of cats or other “eliminators”.
  3. The birds can eat a small amount and quickly find shelter on branches to digest. Then they will eat more and fly to a branch.

Don’t fret if you hang a new feeder and they don’t come to it right away. Sometimes it takes a while for them to find it. But when they do, sit back and enjoy the show! You will soon be mesmerized too.